Diagnosing low vision

Did you ever realize that there are actually many different categories of blindness and low vision? Being visually impaired isn’t as black-and-white as it might appear to be on the surface. In fact, the World Health Organization breaks low vision down into at least six classifications, ranging from “mild or no visual impairment” to “blindness.” The sixth category of blindness is described as having no light perception whatsoever. However, in all of the other categories, it is acknowledged that people who are legally blind (defined by the American Optometric Association as having vision that cannot be corrected to better than 20/200 in the best eye or having 20 degrees or less of visual field remaining) can still see varying levels of shades and their surroundings. In addition, there are also a large number of differing causes for the loss of vision. While some people experience a loss of central vision and develop a blind spot, other people may lose their peripheral vision and be unable to see objects off to the side.

The most effective way of determining your visual acuity is to be examined by an optometrist who specializes in rehabilitating people with low vision. The American Optometric Association explains that there are many different treatment options available, including visual therapy, therapeutic filters, magnification, and special prescriptions. At your eye exam, the optometrist will be able to determine your individual symptoms and measurements. He or she may evaluate your visual field and range, check your color perception, and measure your sensitivity to light in order to fully diagnose your condition. From there, your doctor can give you advice about adapting your current lifestyle to any low vision problems you may be experiencing. By getting affordable help through your True Dental Discounts membership, you can guarantee a clearer future for your eyes and get started on a treatment plan to preserve your vision.

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